Survival Guide: What To Eat In The Wilderness [Infographic]

Thanks to an infographic from UK Oak Doors , I just learned what I could eat if all the supermarkets closed and I was forced to forage i...


Thanks to an infographic from UK Oak Doors, I just learned what I could eat if all the supermarkets closed and I was forced to forage in the fields and woods to eat to live.

Turns out my wilderness diet would consist of dandelions (yes, even the pretty yellow flowers are edible), wild onions (you’d know ‘em by their smell, for sure), and, most surprising (to me at least): cattails!

Cattails are those tall green plants with dark brown tops that look like pieces of poop. You see them growing in wetlands, like shallow swamps or little ponds. Apparently the stems and the roots are edible. Not too sure about that top brown poop-looking part, though.

What are your thoughts? Please comment below and share this article!

What To Eat In The Wilderness: Survival Guide Infographic
credit: Artofmanliness


Mark Weber is a versatile blog and web writer in Buffalo, New York. He’s known for starting “Pianos in Public,” taking old upright pianos, painting them, and placing them around his city. See pictures at his site, Beautifulbuffalo.com.

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  1. I guess we'd be eating a lot of dandelions around here in a desperate type of survival scenario as they certainly as plentiful. Just recently read about a recipe for dandelion jelly, not sure how I feel about that! But I think it requires a lot of sugar added. Cattails I would be to a lesser extent, if I wasn't decorating with them. (Of course we're talking survival here so I guess I better just eat them!)

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  2. This is by far one the most practical and informational infographic on the subject of survival preparedness

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  3. Thanks for this detail infographic! Up until now my knowledge on plants has been limited to Cattail

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    1. Thanks for your feedback! Glad we could help expand your knowledge bank

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  4. Wonderful blog!! This really is extremely practical and helpful information! Thanks for writing! Appreciate it!

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    1. Glad you like! Let me know how it work for you

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  5. What a great list -- I think maybe I need to print it out and take it on hikes. I agree with the word of warning though; it can be easy to mix things up!

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    Replies
    1. Glad you like it Jen! Please comeback to share your experience using this list on your next hiking adventure :)

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